To follow up on our American Foul Brood discussion at our "fun" meeting.   Here is one response on how to handle it.

As I mentioned we must be diligent in our hive inspections.  Don't just look for the good stuff like eggs, larva, honey, bee bread etc.  Take some time to look for sunken brood caps, coffee like goo under these caps.  A foul smell which can sometimes be detected just by lifting the lid.   If you see something unusual... take a picture, send it to Caitlin or me, call us.  We need to ensure this doesn't get out of control and your diligence is the only way we can stop the spread of AFB.  

There is a link to a video of Dr. Ellis explaining how to detect AFB.  I will post it when I find it again.

Bee safe, Bee diligent !      

Kevin 

Begin forwarded message:


From: "Ellis, James" a title="mailto:jdellis@ufl.edu" href="mailto:jdellis@ufl.edu">jdellis@ufl.edu>
Subject: RE: American foulbrood
Date: June 1, 2016 at 11:38:01 AM EDT
To: John Rochester a title="mailto:john.rochestertrees@gmail.com" href="mailto:john.rochestertrees@gmail.com">john.rochestertrees@gmail.com>
Cc: "Westervelt, Dave (David.Westervelt@freshfromflorida.com)" a title="mailto:David.Westervelt@freshfromflorida.com" href="mailto:David.Westervelt@freshfromflorida.com">David.Westervelt@freshfromflorida.com>

Jo,

Thanks for the email. With AFB, I would destroy the gloves, veils, suits, etc.....any clothing contacting infected colonies. I'm not sure about boots, but it likely is OK to "wash" them and continue to use them.

I would mow the grass and move new colonies to a different spot in the same yard. I think moving the bees (the future colonies) 10 m (30 feet) or so from where they are now should be sufficient as long as there isn't anything at the old spot to attract them back (say, wax on the ground, etc.).

I've cc'ed David Westervelt in the event he wants to weigh in on this.

For the clothes - you can was the suit/clothes/etc. in the washer with bleach and that should take out the spores. I think I would recommend getting new gloves and a new veil as they are harder to disinfect. The hive tool can be washed in bleach solution, as can the metal part of the smoker. If you want to be super careful, you can replace the wooden bellow on the smoker.

Hope this helps.

David - am I missing anything?

Thanks.

Jamie

Jamie Ellis, PhD
Gahan Associate Professor
Honey Bee Research and Extension Laboratory
Department of Entomology and Nematology
University of Florida
Bldg 970 Natural Area Drive
PO Box 110620
Gainesville, FL 32611-0620
Email: jdellis@ufl.edu
www.ufhoneybee.com
www.afbee.com
www.ufnativebuzz.com
@ UFhoneybeelab




-----Original Message-----
From: John Rochester [mailto:john.rochestertrees@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, June 01, 2016 9:09 AM
To: Ellis, James <jdellis@ufl.edu>
Cc: John Coldwell <j.coldwell@ymail.com>
Subject: American foulbrood

Dr Ellis,
John Rochester here with the broward beekeepers association we are having a problem with  foulbrood at our apiary caitlin and roger are on it but there seems to be a lack of clear information on sanitation outside the hive shoes, gloves’,etc ,should the weeds near the hives be considered infected because the bees drop discarded larvae near the hives how far away would be considered safe to start a new apiary.
could you tell me who to ask   


thanks very much—Jo

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Thanks for posting this, Kevin.

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